Titian Vecellio – Venetian ca. 1495-1576

Titian
The outstanding painter of his era, Titian redefined painting and developed a style that not only determined the direction of Venetian painting for the next two centuries but profoundly influenced the work of geniuses distant in time and place, such as Rubens, Velázquez, and Rembrandt. A consummate colorist, Titian exploited the oil medium relatively recently introduced to Italy—to create effects that were quite unlike the clear, linear images of previous Florentine and Venetian painting. Modulating color and shadow through use of an unprecedented number of layered glazes, Titian created forms that are soft and glowing. His preference for diagonal emphasis in composition further broke with the classical conventions of Renaissance art and added dynamism to his canvases that presaged the complexities of Baroque painting.

The painter Titian is so famous in English-speaking countries, and has always been so. So much so that we may forget that this is not in fact his name, and that it is merely an anglicised version of Tiziano.


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The Cambridge Companion to Titian by Patricia Meilman (Editor) – Paperback: 418 pages; Publisher: Cambridge University Press (January 20, 2011)

The Cambridge Companion to Titian serves as an introduction to this prolific artist. Covering all aspects of his life and career, this anthology examines Titian's secular and religions painting, prints, pictures related to poetry, and use of architecture.

Titian (National Gallery London Publications) by Charles Hope, Jennifer Fletcher, Jill Dunkerton – Hardcover: 192 pages Publisher: National Gallery London (March 11, 2003)

Few individuals have had a greater influence on the development of Western painting than the celebrated sixteenth-century Venetian artist Titian (c. 1480–1576). His vibrant colors and masterful brushwork have made his work a constant inspiration to artists, from Rubens to the Impressionists and beyond. Every generation has found something new to admire in his astonishing technique, which enabled him to produce fresh interpretations of the most familiar religious and mythological stories as well as portraits and landscapes. Written by some of the world’s most renowned Titian scholars, this beautifully illustrated book accompanies a major exhibition devoted to the work of this extraordinary artist. Authoritative essays on Titian’s life and times, portraits, replicas, and technique provide the background for a detailed examination of over 40 of his greatest masterpieces—works that provide evidence of Titian’s genius as a stylistic innovator and supreme manipulator of paint.

Titian and Rubens: Power, Politics, and Style by Hilliard T. Goldfarb, David Freedberg, Manuela B. Mena Marques – Paperback, 128 pages (February 1998) University Press of New England


Titian and Venetian Painting, 1450-1590 (Icon Editions) by Bruce Cole – Hardcover, 272 pages (February 1999) Westview Press

Reader review: This book is an elegant and engaging introduction to Titian; it is full of fascinating information and observations not only about Titian but about his times. Cole's explanations of Titian's great works are lucid, sensible, and accessible to general readers and scholars alike. Definitely worth a close look. It is beautifully printed with luscious reproductions. Those in color are reproduced with great fidelity.

Titian's Women by Rona Goffen – Hardcover, 400 pages, Published by Yale Univ Press, 1997

Well-known Renaissance scholar Rona Goffen examines the painter Titian's enduring fascination with the theme of beautiful woman. Goffen offers a new interpretation of the artist's paintings of women in the context of life in 16th-century Venice. Without denying the erotic appeal of Titian's women, Goffen goes beyond sexual suggestion to show the larger themes that women symbolized for the artist. 60 color and 117 b&w illustrations

Titian by Stefano Zuffi – Paperback (March 1996) Art Books Intl Ltd


The Life of Titian by Carlo Ridolfi (Editor), Julia Conaway Bondanella (Editor), Peter Bondanella (Editor), Bruce Cole (Editor), Jody Robin Shiffman (Editor) – Paperback: 160 pages Publisher: Pennsylvania State University Press; New Ed edition (November 1996)

Card catalog description: The Life of Titian by the seventeenth-century Venetian artist and writer Carlo Ridolfi is one of the most important contemporary documentary sources for our understanding of the great Renaissance artist. This new critical edition, the first translation into English of Ridolfi's biography, illuminates his life, his artistic production, and his early critical reputation. The editors address art-historical questions of attribution, provenance, and documentation that Ridolfi's biography raises. Two introductory essays present the nature, scope, and importance of the biography for the study of Titian and Venetian Renaissance art and place Ridolfi in the tradition of Renaissance biography and artistic literature. The annotations provide a useful and current bibliography drawn from both art history and literature. The Life of Titian will be of interest to a wide audience of scholars and students of the history of Renaissance art, literature, language, and culture.

Titian (Library of Great Masters) by Filippo Bedrocco Book Co Riverside – Paperback, Published by Riverside Book Co, 1994

In the quarter century since the last catalogue raisonné of Titian, more research has been carried out on the painter than in the whole of the previous four hundred years. New documentation has come to light, pictures have been cleaned and major exhibitions have allowed for scrupulous comparisons to be made. As a result, Titian's whole oeuvre has been reassessed, many old questions of attribution settled—and a few new ones raised.

Titian's place as one of the giants of Western culture has never been in doubt. He represents the culmination of the Venetian school, evolving a technique of free, spontaneous brushwork and a rendering of form through color that amazed his contemporaries and is now seen by some as foreshadowing Impressionism. In a long life of nearly ninety years he painted hundreds of canvases, ranging from moving and intense religious images, through penetratingly psychological portraits (including Charles V and Philip II of Spain) to sensuously erotic mythological scenes like Bacchus and Ariadne and the Venus of Urbino. Over 250 paintings are now attributed to him. All are illustrated here with detailed commentaries giving the circumstances of their commission, their subsequent history and stylistic analysis. Also included is an exhaustive bibliography. The fruit of many years' research, Titian is a monument of scholarship that will remain definitive for the foreseeable future.


Painting in Sixteenth Century Venice: Titian, Veronese, Tintoretto Hardcover by David Painting in Cinquecento Venice Rosand – Revised, Paperback, 352 pages, Published by Cambridge Univ Press (Pap Txt), 1997


Titian to 1518: The Assumption of Genius by Paul Joannides – Hardcover: 384 pages Publisher: Yale University Press (March 1, 2002)

Titian's work has been admired and analyzed in countless studies over the centuries, from the classic study by Vasari to Filippo Pedrocco's recent, well-received catalogue raison . But most scholars minimize the seemingly impenetrable forest of Titian's early work. Joannides (art history, Cambridge), the first to present an entire book devoted to Titian's youthful oeuvre, tries to identify the trees. His main purpose is to establish that the themes developed early in Titian's career were carried out in his later works. Using the latest research and attributions, the author rearranges the usual assigned chronology of Titian's paintings and weaves a thread through his relationship with Giorgione, the Bellinis, and del Piombo. Titian was competitive with Michelangelo's compositions and Raphael's portraiture in the development of figure painting. Ultimately, the author is convincing, making constant reference and cross reference and moving from visual link to visual link in the paintings. The book has a unique feature, a historiographical table that documents the attribution of Titian paintings by prominent scholars, as well as 146 color and 126 black-and-white illustrations. This densely written and fully realized scholarship is suited for connoisseurs of Renaissance painting as well as academics, curators, and artists. It should be considered for acquisition by large public, museum, and academic libraries. Ellen Bates, New York City —Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Portrait of an Artist: Titian (1989) Color, NTSC
VHS Release Date: June 16, 2000
Run Time: 57 minutes

Titian, master painter of the Venetian Renaissance school, had an incalculable influence on the course of European art. As this program shows, he was also a master of self-promotion and could be ruthless in his pursuit of wealth and prestige. Taking us to Venice, Rome, Madrid, and Vienna to view Titian's work, this program recounts the drama of his life and reveals the magnificence of his talent.

Titian Number of discs: 1; Studio: Jake Auerbach Films (2003)


Titian and Tragic Painting: Aristotle's "Poetics" and the Rise of the Modern Artist by Thomas Puttfarken – Hardcover: 256 pages Publisher: Yale University Press (November 10, 2005)

Late in his life Titian created a series of paintings—the “Four Sinners,” the “poesie” for his patron Philip II of Spain, and the “Final Tragedies”—that were dark in tone and content, full of pathos and physical suffering.

In this major reinterpretation of Titian’s art, Thomas Puttfarken shows that the often dramatic and violent subject matter of these works was not, as is often argued, the consequence of the artist’s increasing age and sense of isolation and tragedy. Rather, these paintings were influenced by discussions of Aristotle’s Poetics that permeated learned discourse in Italy in the mid-sixteenth century. The Poetics led directly to a rich theory of the visual arts, and painting in particular, that enabled artists like Titian to consider themselves on equal footing with poets. Puttfarken investigates Titian’s late works in this context and analyzes his relations with his patrons, his intellectual and humanistic contacts, and his choices of subject matter, style, and technique.

Renaissance Rivals: Michelangelo, Leonardo, Raphael, Titian by Rona Goffen – Paperback: 532 pages Publisher: Yale University Press (August 11, 2004)

“Who would have thought that the serene masterpieces of the High Renaissance owed so much of their vitality to backstage brawling? Only Rona Goffen knows enough to trace these labyrinthine rivalries. In her book the artists take on cinematic vitality, making us see the artifacts produced by such creative brawlers in entirely new ways. They are knockouts. So is her book.”—Garry Wills

"This lively and appealing book is an important achievement. . . . Magnificently researched and handsomely produced, Renaissance Rivals advances the discussion of a central aspect of early modern culture. In doing so, it has no rivals."—Werner Gundersheimer, American Scholar

Titian by Filippo Pedrocco – Hardcover: 328 pages Publisher: Rizzoli International Publications (March 7, 2001)

In the quarter century since the last catalogue raisonné of Titian, more research has been carried out on the painter than in the whole of the previous four hundred years. New documentation has come to light, pictures have been cleaned and major exhibitions have allowed for scrupulous comparisons to be made. As a result, Titian's whole oeuvre has been reassessed, many old questions of attribution settled-- and a few new ones raised.

Titian's place as one of the giants of Western culture has never been in doubt. He represents the culmination of the Venetian school, evolving a technique of free, spontaneous brushwork and a rendering of form through color that amazed his contemporaries and is now seen by some as foreshadowing Impressionism. In a long life of nearly ninety years he painted hundreds of canvases, ranging from moving and intense religious images, through penetratingly psychological portraits (including Charles V and Philip II of Spain) to sensuously erotic mythological scenes like Bacchus and Ariadne and the Venus of Urbino. Over 250 paintings are now attributed to him. All are illustrated here with detailed commentaries giving the circumstances of their commission, their subsequent history and stylistic analysis. Also included is an exhaustive bibliography. The fruit of many years' research, Titian is a monument of scholarship that will remain definitive for the foreseeable future.

Titian: Nymph and Shepherd by Katya Berger Andreadakis, John Berger – Hardcover, 120 pages (August 1996) International Book Import Service, Inc.


Titian's 'Venus of Urbino' (Masterpieces in Western Painting) by Rona Goffen (Editor) – Paperback, 192 pages, Published by Cambridge Univ Press (Pap Txt), 1997

The Publisher: A quintessential work of the High Renaissance in Venice, Titian's Venus of Urbino also represents one of the major themes of Western art: the female nude. But how did Titian intend this work to be received? Is she Venus, as the popular title—a modern invention—implies, or is she merely a courtesan? This book tackles this and other questions in six essays by European and American art historians. Examining the work within the context of Renaissance art theory, as well as the psychology and society of sixteenth-century Italy, and even in relation to Manet's nineteenth-century "translation" of the work, their observations begin and end with the painting itself and with appreciation of Titian's great achievement in creating this archetypal image of feminine beauty.

Titian: Prince of Painters by Titian, Susanna Biadene, Mary Yakush – Hardcover, 452 pages, Published by International Book Import Service, Inc., 1990

This excellent catalog of the 1990-1991 exhibition in Venice and Washington is a work of permanent value. Featuring essays by 16 authorities, primarily Italian and American, on every aspect of the art of Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, c. 1490-1576), the quintessential Venetian artist of the high Renaissance, the work transcends the limits of spatial and temporal exhibition to summarize and extend current scholarship. At the same time, the text is accessible, well translated, and aimed at a broad audience. Many of the works in the exhibit were conserved or cleaned, so the book features fresh illustrations and a hefty amount of technical discussion of specialist interest. A distinguished addition to the vast bibliography, recommended for all art collections. —Jack Perry Brown, Ryer son & Burnham Libs., Art Inst. of Chicago Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Titian's Portraits Through Aretino's Lens by Luba Freedman, Pietro Aretino – Hardcover, 215 pages, Published by Pennsylvania State Univ Press (Txt), 1995

Among sixteenth-century Renaissance painters, Titian made his reputation, and much of his living, by portraiture. Titian's portraits were promoted by his friend, Pietro Aretino, an eminent poet and critic, who addressed his letters and sonnets to the same personages Titian portrayed.

In many of these letters (which often included sonnets), Aretino described both an individual patron and Titian's portrait of that patron, thus stimulating the reciprocal relation between a verbal and pictorial portrait. By investigating this unprecedented historical phenomenon, Luba Freedman elucidates the meaning conveyed by the portrait as an artistic form in Renaissance Italy.

Fusing iconographical analysis of the most famous Titian portraits with rhetorical analysis of Aretino's literary legacy as compared to contemporary reactions, Freedman demonstrates that it is due to Titian's many portraits and to Aretino's repeated simultaneous writings about them that the portrait ceased being primarily a social-historical document, preserving the sitter's likeness for posterity. It gradually became, as it is today, a work of art, the artist's invention, which gives its viewer an aesthetic pleasure.

Veiled Images: Titian's Mythological Paintings for Philip II by Jane Nash –
Hardcover, Published by Art Alliance Press, 1986


Titian 500 (Studies in the History of Art, Vol 45) by Joseph Manca (Editor), Joesph Manca – Hardcover, 418 pages, Published by Natl Gallery of Art, 1994

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Titian: Sacred and Profane Love by Federico Zeri, Marco Dolcetta – Hardcover, 48 pages (September 2000) NDE Publishing


Titian:The Venetian Colorist (1991) Color, NTSC
VHS Release Date: June 18, 1996
Run Time: 27 minutes



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