Consumer: Buying, Selling & Caring for Art
Caring for Your Art: A Guide for Artists, Collectors, Galleries, and Art Institutions by Jill Snyder, Joseph Montague - 208 pages; Allworth Press; 3rd edition (November 27, 2001) Best Seller

Step by step, readers will learn how to store and handle art properly, photograph art, insure and secure art, set up proper environmental controls, mat and frame safely, and utilize manual and computer systems for record keeping. This third edition also features all-new information on technological advances, materials, methods, and art forms, plus interviews with leading experts.

Collecting American Paintings: Identification & Value by A. Everette James, Jr. – Hardcover: 317 pages Publisher: Collector Books (November 30, 2005)

A. Everette James, Jr. SCM, MD A. Everette James, author of North Carolina Art Pottery, 1900 - 1960, has produced an all-new title, this time focusing on collectible American paintings. In this comprehensive book with more than 300 photographs and more than 450 illustrations, he outlines the necessary steps in selecting a painting, authenticating a painting, determining a value, acquiring a painting at auction, and evaluating the condition of a piece. Both major and minor artists are briefly discussed, and overviews of Impressionism, Tonalism, The Aschan School, African-American artists, and Southern Women artists are presented. There are even tips on managing your art collection, the realities of funding and financing, and collecting what you can afford. The beauty of American art is evident in this collector's guide - a must-have for collectors of American paintings and collectors of art in general

At Home With Art: How Art-Lovers Live With and Care for Their Treasures by Estelle Ellis, Caroline Seebohm, Christopher Simon Sykes – Hardcover (September 1999)

At Home with Art is about art lovers, their passion for art, and their seemingly unquenchable desire to bring home the works that have captured their hearts. Whether the artworks are Picassos or posters, these people want to acquire and live with the art they love. "I wake up in the morning and exercise where I can look at it," says John Robson about one of the paintings in his San Francisco townhouse. How these art lovers integrate their finds into their living spaces, juxtaposing their paintings and sculpture with the artifacts of everyday life – furniture, rugs, books, lamps, objets d'art – is vividly illustrated here in more than fifty homes inhabited by people for whom living with art is as essential as breathing.

These homes are not mini-museums with art to be admired from a respectful distance. Nor have they been designed by interior decorators whose goal is to harmonize the upholstery with the pictures. Each home has been chosen for its very personal and inspired expression of art and decor, revealing a deep, even spiritual, relationship between the pictures on the walls and the people who place them there. From airy lofts and old farmhouses to sleek city apartments and cozy traditional houses, all are made special by the paintings and sculptures within.

A wide variety of people appear in these pages, from the president of MoMA to a young man in love with poster art, to the writer who has artist friends, to the young woman who inherited pieces from her mother, to the actress whose art travels with her wherever she goes. The kinds of art that speak to them and that they are impelled to acquire range from old masters to outsider art, from folk art to contemporary art, to prints, drawings, photographs, and sculpture. We learn about what sparked their interest in a particular genre, how they make their selections, how they meld them into their homes, and what living with their art means to them.

Though looking at these interiors proves there are no fixed rules about displaying a work of art, special sections on framing, hanging, lighting, and caring for art, from oil paintings to delicate works on paper, provide technical assistance. A directory includes framers, dealers, auction houses, and restorers in major American cities and in London.

Above all, At Home with Art shows that there are all kinds of art to be loved and cherished, however grand or simple, and that living surrounded by art's beauty can bring boundless personal satisfaction.

Caring for Your Collections by Arthur W. Schultz (Editor), Huntington T. Block, Robert McCormick Adams (Illustrator) – Hardcover, 216 pages (April 1992)

Although a vast amount of our country's art and antiques is still in private hands, most books on conservation and maintenance have been written for professional curators and museum staff members. This handy and eminently readable volume is the first comprehensive, practical care guide aimed at the average person. 118 illustrations, 50 in full color.

Art Information and the Internet: How to Find It, How to Use It by Lois Swan Jones – Paperback, 232 pages (October 1998) Oryx Press

Shows Internet users how to locate online art information and images and how to supplement these data with material in other formats to produce the best research results.

The Care of Bronze Sculpture: Recommended Maintenance Programs for the Collector by Patrick V. Kipper – Paperback: 64 pages, Rodgers & Nelsen Publishing Co. (June 1996)


Scala Vision Guide to Art on the Internet by Douglas Davis – Paperback, 144 pages, iBooks, (June 2002)

The Scalavision Guide To Art On The Internet combats information overload by listing only the best, most useful, most consistently accurate sources of information on hundreds of art subjects. These sites have been selected after an exhaustive surfing process to weed out incomplete, inaccurate and out-of-date sources. Whether it's Monet or cave paintings, the Uffizi Gallery or the Museum of Modern Art, this book takes you right to the best sites, complete with a wealth of screenshots to help you decide at a glance if this is the site you need. Best of all, it's linked to the new Scalavision web site for information and access to new sites as they are established.

Caring for Your Art by Jill Snyder, Joseph Montague (Illustrator), Maria Reidelbach Paperback, 192 pages Revised edition, Allworth Press, 1996

Caring for Your Art describes the best methods to store, handle, mount and frame, display, document and inventory, photograph, pack, transport, insure, and secure art. Coverage is also given to proper environmental controls to protect art works. The non-technical approach makes the book ideal for artists, collectors, galleries, and small non-profit institutions. The revised edition includes a chapter on new computer applications in these areas.

The Basics of Buying Art by Cindi R. Maciolek – Paperback, 175 pages 1st edition Grand Arbor Press

This book offers beginners the simple and honest A, B, C's of developing a collection of contemporary art. With integrity and insight, it answers many questions about the often mysterious world of art as well as the business of art. In simple to read language, it arms readers with the right knowledge to avoid the pitfalls, while maintaining an enthusiasm that viewing and acquiring art have to offer.

Legal Guide to Buying and Selling Art and Collectibles by Armen R. Vartian – Paperback, 200 pages (April 1997) Bonus Books

A private dealer who got her start as a clerk at a department store gallery in the 1960s, Frank sets out to bring knowledge and confidence to novices who might be interested in modern art but feel shut out by the "mystique" of the art world. Her convivial tone and offhanded dismissals of gallerists and critics may go far in developing readers' self-assurance, but, unfortunately, her casual way with the facts of her business call the work as a whole into question. Artists' names are misspelled, art historical terms are confused, and her own pronouncements on the art world sometimes sound as autocratic as those she criticizes. (Bibliography not seen.) By contrast, Vartian, a lawyer for galleries and collectors, has written a useful if sober guide to the legalities of collecting art and popular items such as stamps and coins. His text will not inspire any reader actually to enter the world of collecting; indeed his anecdotes of theft, fraud, and miscommunication may scare some away. But anyone who has bought even one work and suddenly realizes the need to learn the basics will welcome his clear explanations. Offering just the right amount of detail, he discusses the various tax advantages of being an investor rather than a collector and what to consider when choosing between reserves and guaranties if consigning at auction. Frank's book cannot be recommended in its current form; Vartarian's work will serve flea-market mavens and art connoisseurs alike in almost all public library collections. —Eric Bryant, "Library Journal" Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.


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